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Welcome to Caratzas / Melissa International

Welcome to our site. It contains a complete listing of Aristide D. Caratzas / Melissa International Ltd. publications, and in addition a small number of titles distributed but not published by us.

The site is updated continuously, not only with new title announcements, but also as to price and availability (whether a title is in stock, not yet in print, out of stock or out of print). If you have an interest in our publication program we urge you to check on a regular basis (and join our email list for update notices and other announcements).

The titles are organized and cross listed (often more than once) under the appropriate categories. These are listed on the left side of this Home Page and on the bottom of all pages.

Philobiblos Notes is our newsletter and as such it provides more extended updates, additional information on authors and projects, and publisher comments.

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 Some New Titles

A Concise History of the Campaign in Asia Minor, 1919-1922

New!
Hellenic Army General Staff: Army History Directorate
 
xxiv+559 pages, 35 halftones and 75 sketchmaps (most are foldouts)
Hardbound

 

Special Distribution Item.


Late Ottoman 0zmir-Smyrna

New!

 The Dynamic of Inter-Communal Relations, 1826-1864

Conventional historical studies of 0zmir-Smyrna have depicted its Greeks and Turks as two separate and “conflicting communities or “nations. This simplistic approach limits a meaningful analysis of the complexity of the ethnically and religiously diverse Ottoman society in the mid-nineteenth century.

Dr. Feryal Tansu, the author of this study, examines and tries to establish when this perception of conflicting Greek-Turkish communities first began to develop in 0zmir-Smyrna, whether it was a result of the oppressive policies of Sultan Mahmud II during the Greek uprising of the 1821, or perhaps of the Tanzimat, which created unrest among both the Muslim and non-Muslim populations in some parts of the Ottoman Empire.

In the process, she describes the reality of every day life and contact between ethnic groups. In this context Dr. Tansu examines the impact on interaction between the Greek, Turkish and other communities as seen through the modernization paradigm; she looks at values, norms, culture and consumption patterns as a way of analyzing the urban development of what was at the time one of the most flourishing cities of the Mediterranean.



Late Ottoman Izmir-Smyrna

New!

The Dynamic of Inter-Communal Relations, 1826-1864

Feryal Tansug

Hardbound: xvi+256 pages, includes halftones  

Conventional historical studies of Izmir-Smyrna have depicted its Greeks and Turks as two separate and “conflicting communities or “nations. This simplistic approach limits a meaningful analysis of the complexity of the ethnically and religiously diverse Ottoman society in the mid-nineteenth century.

Dr. Feryal Tansug, the author of this study, examines and attempts to establish when this perception of conflicting Greek-Turkish communities first began to develop in Izmir-Smyrna, whether it was a result of the oppressive policies of Sultan Mahmud II during the Greek uprising of the 1821, or perhaps of the Tanzimat, which created unrest among both the Muslim and non-Muslim populations in some parts of the Ottoman Empire.

In the process, Dr. Tansug describes the reality of every day life and contact between ethnic groups. In this context she examines in significant detail the impact on interaction between the Greek, Turkish and other communities as seen through the modernization paradigm; she looks at values, norms, culture and consumption patterns as a way of analyzing the urban development of what was at the time one of the most flourishing cities of the Mediterranean.

Chapters include, “A Flourishing City, “Socio-Economic Networks in Nineteenth Century Izmir, “Ottoman Modernization, “An Enraged Sultan and ‘The Greek Intrigue,’ “Communal Relations In the Post-1840s Period, and extended bibliographical lists and annotations.

Feryal Tansug, is a member of the Department of Sociology at Bahçesehir University; her interests include social-cultural and economic history of multi-cultural Ottoman society in the 19th century; center-periphery relations in the Ottoman Empire; social and economic history of the northern Aegean islands during the Ottoman period. She is editor (or co-editor) of two volumes on cultural, ethnic and social history of later Ottoman society and the author of many articles.


 


The Genocide of the Ottoman Greeks

The Genocide of the Ottoman Greeks

New!

Studies on the State Sponsored Campaign of Extermination of the Christians of Asia Minor (1912-1922) and Its Aftermath: History, Law, Memory

Edited by Tessa Hofmann, Matthias Bjørnlund and Vasileios Meichanetsidis 

hardcover; 512 pages, 37 photographs, maps

The period of transition from the collapse of the Ottoman Empire to the foundation of the Turkish Republic was characterized by a number of processes largely guided by a narrow elite that aimed to construct a modern, national state. One of these processes was the deliberate and planned elimination, indeed extermination, of the Christian (and certain other) minorities. According to demographic studies, the numbers are stark: In 1912 the areas of Asia Minor and Thrace were inhabited by about 4-5 million Christians and 7-8 million Muslims; by 1923 only 250-300,000 Christians remained.

Raphael Lemkin, the legal scholar who introduced the term genocide into international law, formulated his early ideas on the definition of this war crime by studying the destruction of the Christians of Asia Minor, while the distinguished Turcologist Neoklis Sarris has noted that the annihilation of the Christian minorities represented an integral element in the formation of the Turkish Republic. As the editors of this volume note the recent resolution by the International Association of Genocide Scholars recognizing the Greek and Syriac genocides suggests a wider range of victim groups. This volume therefore represents an effort to provide an outline and a direction of a more extensive study of the deliberate destruction and elimination of a Greek presence that spanned over three millennia, in the space that became the Turkish Republic.

The last two decades have seen a massive amount of research of the genocide of the Armenian population in the Ottoman/Turkish space; our publishing house has produced a number of works, most notable of which was the eyewitness testimony of the Leslie A. Davis, US Consul in Harput (The Slaughterhouse Province: An American Diplomat's Report on the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1917). Much less scholarly work has been done on the genocide of the Greeks of Asia Minor and Thrace; there are many reasons for this, including the fact that Turkish governments have been successful in intimidating diplomats in the context of Turkish-Greek relations of the last generation, and of subverting academic integrity (inducing some scholars to make a career as denialists supported by international NGOs, all in the name of countering nationalism).

The volume includes article contributions on the areas subtitled: Historical Overview, Documentation, Interpretation; Representations and Law; Genocide Education; Memorialization; Conceptualization; and a very extensive Bibliography.

 

"Rarely does a new publication raise both the serious study and public awareness of its subject to a new level. The volume under review is such a work. In recent years genocide scholars have increased their attention on the systematic state sponsored eradication of the historic Christian communities of Asia Minor by the Ottoman Empire and its successor state. Many scholarly works have appeared focusing on the fate of the Armenians during this period, but little has been written of a similar scope and quality concerning the Ottoman Greeks. The publisher, editors and contributors to this volume are to be congratulated for making a significant contribution to addressing this serious gap in the literature and providing scholars interested in investigating this subject with important studies, copious documentation, and visual and bibliographic aides. Moreover they have placed the historical information concerning Asia Minor Greeks into the theoretical and legal context of the field of genocide studies.... Everyone concerned with making the genocide of Ottoman Greeks better known should advocate that public libraries, universities and cultural institutions add this fine volume to their collections. The publishers and the scholars who came together to create this important publication have established a new standard of excellence for the field." — C. G. Hatzidimitriou, AHIF Policy Journal (Winter, 2012-13)

 

"The book presents valuable statistical and population data on the mosaic of ancient and modern peoples in Anatolia. Studies range from government policy to perpetrators, to the Greek invasion of Asia Minor, and to the efforts of the American Near East Relief and the International Rescue Committee. One study explores the role of genocide in support of nationalism. This informative read will stimulate further study and thought regarding the mass murders of the 20th and 21st centuries. Highly recommended. Most levels/ libraries." — Choice (August 2012) 



The Ghosts of Plaka Beach

New!

A Story of Murder and Retribution in Wartime Greece

Second Edition, Expanded

Stylianos Perrakis

Hardbound: 296 pages, 20 halftones, 2 maps  

Perrakis wrote a book that transcends the boundaries of family history. Despite its personal focus and small scale, The Ghosts of Plaka Beach is one of the most insightful books about the Greek civil war.

This is a book about events that have gone, for the most part, unrecorded. It is easy to understand why: they do not fit easily into conventional historical narratives. Those narratives posit a neatly delineated world, divided between heroes and villains, patriots and traitors, perpetrators and victims. Perrakis, instead, reveals nuances, gray zones, and uncomfortable truths: of resistance fighters turning into mass criminals; of collaborators driven by revenge rather than ideology; of ordinary people who far from being mere innocent and passive recipients of the surrounding violence are also active, if often myopic, agents of the wars violence; but also of unexpected small acts of great courage and compassion.

In short, this is a book that approaches civil war not as a clash of ideologies or an abstract political event but as a lived experience: a process, in other words, that engenders its own infernal logic far beyond the initial intentions of the various leaders and the lofty ideals that animate those who end up writing about it; a world where the failure to recognize the limits of ones own capabilities breeds myopic and destructive behavior, a world that turns neighbors and friends into enemies, nicely described by Perrakis as a quicksand into which everybody slid step by step till it was too late to pull out. This book is less about bad people and more about ordinary people during bad times.

From the Foreword by Stathis N. Kalyvas


 


Constantine XI Dragas Palaeologus

New!
A Biography of the Last Greek Emperor
Marios Philippides
Hellenism: Ancient, Mediaeval, Modern, 17
Appx. 700 p.

Clothbound



 Product of the Day!

Lost Opportunities

 
The Cyprus Question, 1950-1963
Evangelos Averoff-Tossizza
 
viii+440 p.
Clothbound